08/08/2012

U.N. and U.S. napalm attacks

NapalmVillageJan1951bombardement au napalm d'un village nord-coréen.jpg

Napalm.Vietnam.1972.jpg

Photo 1: North Korea 1951, village bombed with napalm by the United Nations military forces.

Photo 2: Vietnam, June 8, 1972. Crying children, including 9-year-old Kim Phuc, center, run down Route 1 near Trang Bang, Vietnam after an aerial napalm attack on suspected Viet Cong hiding places as South Vietnamese forces from the 25th Division walk behind them.


The use of napalm or other incendiaries against civilian populations was banned by the United Nations Convention on Certain Conventional Weapons(CCW) in 1980. Protocol III of the CCW restricts the use of all incendiary weapons, but a number of states have not acceded to all of the protocols of the CCW. According to the Stockholm International Peace Research Institute(SIPRI), states are considered a party to the convention, which entered into force as international law in December 1983, if they ratify at least two of the five protocols. The United States, for example, is a party to the CCW but did not sign protocol III.