07/09/2012

Syria and the US intervention in Chile...

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U.S. Central Intelligence Agency in Chile

40 years ago, the U.S. Central Intelligence Agency (CIA) secretly spent millions of dollars funding Chilean opposition groups.  The Chilean economy was destroyed. After a military coup, General Pinochet came to power.  Thousands of Chileans were torturted and murdered.

It is clear that the CIA plays also a central role in the events in the Middle East. 

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In 1970, a Socialist, Salvador Allende, was elected President of Chile.
The U.S. Central Intelligence Agency (CIA) secretly spent millions of dollars funding Chilean opposition groups, to "create pressures, exploit weaknesses [and] magnify obstacles" for Allende.
Within a few years the Chilean economy was in chaos, and the CIA spent at least $11 million more to plan and fund a coup that would put General Pinochet in power.
Almost comically unaware, Allende gave Pinochet complete command of the Army.
On 11 September 1973, the coup toppled Chile's government, and Allende was either killed or committed suicide.

Pinochet promptly appointed himself President, suspended the Constitution, closed Parliament, banned opposition political activists, illegalized trade unions, and initiated media censorship. Soccer stadiums and military bases were converted into prisons, while new prisons were rapidly constructed. "Liberal" judges were fired, and suspected leftists were rounded up, imprisoned, tortured, and killed. Thousands of people who spoke out against Pinochet, were arrested, and never heard from again. They were called "the disappeared".
During this time, the head of Chile's secret police was on the CIA payroll.

The U.S. was one of the first nations to recognize Pinochet's presidency as "legitimate", and restored foreign aid that had been stopped while Allende was President.
In short, Pinochet was America's man in Chile.

In 2004,  a year-long investigation into state-sponsored torture in Chile has documented that an estimated 35,000 people were abused during the 1973-90 military regime.

The National Commission on Political Prisoners and Torture presented its study to President Ricardo Lagos. The three volumes include hundreds of new claims about torture tactics, ranging from sexual abuse using dogs, to forcing suspects to watch as family members were sodomised or slowly electrocuted.

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U.S. Central Intelligence Agency in Egypt

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Omar Suleiman, Egypt’s top spy chief (photo), has long been favored by the US government for his ardent anti-Islamism and willingness to talk and act tough about Iran, and he has been the CIA’s main man in Cairo.  Suleiman is a favorite of Israel too; he held the “Israel Dossier” and directed Egypt’s efforts to crush Hamas by demolishing the tunnels that have functioned as a smuggling conduit for weapons and foodstuffs to Gaza.

In the mid-1990s, Suleiman worked closely with the Clinton administration in devising and implementing its rendition program. Each rendition was authorized at the very top levels of both governments [the US and Egypt].... He negotiated directly with top CIA-officials.

Under the Bush administration, in the context of the global “war on terror,” US renditions got “extraordinary,” meaning that the objective of kidnapping and extra-legal transfer was no longer for trial but rather interrogation for actionable intelligence.
The rendition program landed some people in CIA black sites and others were turned over for torture-by-proxy to other regimes. 
Egypt figured large as a torture destination of choice, as did Suleiman as Egypt’s torturer-in-chief.

At least one person extraordinarily rendered by the CIA to Egypt—Egyptian-born Australian citizen Mamdouh Habib—was tortured by Suleiman himself.
In October 2001, Habib was seized off a bus by Pakistani security forces. While detained in Pakistan, at the behest of America agents he was suspended from a hook and electrocuted repeatedly. He was then turned over to the CIA, and in the process of transporting him to Egypt he endured the usual treatment: his clothes were cut off, a suppository was stuffed in his anus, and he was diapered and “wrapped up like a spring roll.”
In Egypt, as Habib recounts in his memoir, My Story: The Tale of a Terrorist Who Wasn’t, he was repeatedly subjected to electric shocks, immersed in water up to his nostrils, beaten, his fingers were broken and he was hung from metal hooks. At one point, his interrogator slapped him so hard that his blindfold was dislodged, revealing the identity of his tormentor: Suleiman. Frustrated that Habib was not providing useful information or confessing to involvement in terrorism, Suleiman ordered a guard to murder a shackled Turkistani prisoner in front of Habib, which he did with a viscious karate kick.
In April 2002, after five months in Egypt, Habib was rendered to American custody at Bagram prison in Afghanistan, and then transported to Guantanamo. 
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Chilean Women’s Resistance in the Arpillera Movement:

'Egypt was a common destination for torture of detainees sent by U.S.'

CIA:
https://www.cia.gov/library/publications/the-world-factbook/geos/us.html

Embassy of Syria in Santiago: